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SIF – ALDEF Post Distribution Monitoring Report [ Eid UL Adha Project ] Wajir Aug-Sep 2017

SIF – ALDEF Post Distribution Monitoring Report [ Eid UL Adha Project ] Wajir Aug-Sep 2017

Drought situation in Wajir County is currently classified as stressed (phase 2) but some parts are classified as Crisis (phase3). Majority of the household have minimal adequate food consumption and are unable to afford some essential food commodities. The areas that are classified as crisis (phase 3) include: parts of pastoral all species in Wajir West Sub County and pastoral cattle in Wajir South Sub County. These areas are the most affected parts of the County which experienced depressed rainfall in the current and previous seasons that led to poor pasture, browse and water, However due to the migration to other thought better off sub-counties and overcrowding of livestock and people the little available has been depleted fast.

In partnership with ALDEF, SIF and Karama Charity supported a Food voucher one off Ramadan assistance to 1070 households in 16 per urban villages within Wajir town in June-July 2017 and slaughter of 636 goats and sheep. This is follow on SIF funded one month Eid ul Adha sacrifice project Aug-Sept 2017. The projects had to sets of criteria to select beneficiaries;

The purpose of this monitoring activity was to look at the process of eid ul Adha project, targeting, destocking, slaughtering and use delivery mechanism, and other key issues experienced by the beneficiaries. The post-distribution monitoring process administered tools to collect data on household demographics, targeting, destocking and Eid ul Adha meat slaughtering, distribution and uses of meat and cash revived by pastoralist who sold livestock, complain mechanism, satisfaction levels with the project; i.e. 280 household questionnaires, focus Group discussion with beneficiaries at 3 villages (20% of the villages), 3 Key Informant interviews (will elders, traders, veterinary and public departments).

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ASAL Humanitarian Network, Drought Needs Assessment, July 2021

ASAL Humanitarian Network, Drought Needs Assessment, July 2021

The ASAL Humanitarian Network is a platform led by local and national NGOs promoting a humanitarian system that enables more locally-led responses. Its current 30 members are all operational within the Arid and Semi-Arid Land (ASAL) counties in Northern Kenya. They have a wide array of expertise, including food security and livelihoods, cash transfer programming, WASH, media and advocacy and community engagement. As a network, member organizations complement and add value to each other’s programmes and have invested in structures that cover the breadth of the ASAL counties that can be used for rapid and timely delivery of interventions, whilst coming together with a collective voice against injustice.

Following the below average rainfall during the March to May long rains, most counties in Northern and Eastern Kenya are on alert with the worsening drought trend. In this context, ASAL Humanitarian Network, with the technical support from ACTED, conducted a Drought Needs Assessment between 13th – 15th July 2021 covering 9 ASAL counties namely, Baringo, Garissa, Isiolo, Mandera, Marsabit, Samburu, Tana River, Turkana, and Wajir counties. Overall, the assessment covered 21 sub-counties, yielding a total of 113 Key informant Interviews (KIIs).

This needs assessment is meant to be read alongside the NDMA Long Rains Assessment, to complement its findings and provide a snapshot on the current situation.

To gather a holistic image of the current situation, KIIs were captured at three levels. County-level, sub-county level and community level. One (1) county-level National Drought Management Authority (NDMA) officer representative was collected per county.

At the sub-county level, 5 key informants were gathered per sub-county: 1 water department representative, 1 public health department representative, 1 administrator’s office representative, and 2 community-level representatives (1 female and 1 male).

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Kenya Drought Flash Appeal – Oct – Dec 2021 (September 2021)

Kenya Drought Flash Appeal - Oct - Dec 2021 (September 2021)

The cumulative impact of two consecutive poor rainy seasons, coupled with the COVID-19 pandemic, insecurity, pests and diseases have caused humanitarian needs to rapidly rise in the Arid and Semi-Arad Lands (ASAL) region of Kenya, leading to the declaration of a national disaster by the President of Kenya on 8 September 2021. Both the 2020 short rains (October to December) and the 2021 long rains (March to May) were poor across the ASAL counties. The two rainy seasons were characterized by late onset rainfall in most counties, as well as poor distribution of rainfall in time and space. In addition, forecasts indicate that the upcoming short rains season (October to December 2021) is likely to be below-average, compounded by the negative Indian Ocean Dipole

There are now at least 2.1 million people who are severely food insecure and adopting irreversible coping strategies to meet their minimum food needs, and this is expected to rise to nearly 2.4 million people from November 2021, according to the latest Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) analysis. This will include an estimated 368,000 people in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and 2 million people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3), and is nearly three times (852,000) the number of people who were facing high acute food insecurity from October to December 2020. Nine counties are expected to have the highest numbers of people in IPC Phase 3 and above from November 2021 onwards: Turkana, Mandera, Lamu, Garissa, Wajir, Kwale, Kitui, Tana River and Isiolo. Food insecurity is expected to worsen in the period ahead based on the likelihood of poor rains during the upcoming short rains season (October to December).

Livelihoods have been severely impacted by the multiple shocks that communities have endured over the past year. The 2021 long rains production in the marginal areas is expected to be 42 to 70 per cent below the long-term average (LTA) for maize, 61 to 89 per cent below LTA for green grams and 58 to 86 per cent below LTA for cowpeas. For farming households, below-average harvests result in reduced household income, making it difficult for families to purchase food as household food stocks decline. Household maize stocks are 31 to 54 percent below the five-year average in most marginal agricultural areas, with maize stocks projected to last one to two months compared to three or four months normally, according to the 2021 Long Rains Assessment, led by the National Drought Management Agency (NDMA). In pastoral areas, below- average rangeland regeneration has negatively impacted livestock production, resulting in below-average milk production and consumption and high staple food prices. Milk production ranges from 0.25 to 3 litres per household per day compared to the normal 2 to 6 litres. Likewise, daily household milk consumption ranges from 0.25 to 1.6 litres per household per day compared to the average 1 to 3 litres.

Access to water is an urgent concern for both humans and livestock. Many open water sources -including rivers, water pans, and dams- have dried up across pastoral and marginal agricultural livelihood zones, and other open water sources at 20 to 40 percent of capacity. Eighty-seven per cent of counties report above-average distances to water sources for households and 78 per cent report above-average distances to water for livestock, according to the latest NDMA monitoring. Household trekking distances to watering points have increased to an average of 2 to 6 kilometers, up from the five-year average of 1 to 5 kilometers. Across most pastoral areas, livestock return trekking distances have also increased: in Marsabit, trekking distances are exceptionally high at 25 to 30 kilometers, compared to 15 to 20 kilometers normally; in Wajir, livestock trekking distances range from 15 to 20 km, around 3 to 4 times the normal distance of 5 kilometers.

With pastoralists having to walk longer distances in search of water, food and forage for their livestock, tensions among communities have risen and an increase in inter-communal conflict has been reported, according to an assessment by the ASAL Humanitarian Network. Atypical livestock migration is expected to intensify from September through October 2021 and from December 2021 until the beginning of the 2022 March to May long rains, according to the latest IPC analysis. As rangeland resources deteriorate rapidly in the period ahead, migration to dry-season grazing areas and other atypical routes are expected to further intensify, potentially increasing the incidence of resource-based conflict and disrupting markets, schooling, livelihoods and access to health facilities and services